Cloudbreak

Antibacterial Program

Cloudbreak Antibacterial Fc-Conjugates (ABCs) may offer multiple benefits over small-molecule antibacterial drugs against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections.

Cloudbreak

Antibacterial Program

Cloudbreak Antibacterial Fc-Conjugates (ABCs) may offer multiple benefits over small-molecule antibacterial drugs against multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections.

Cloudbreak ABC Program Overview

Cloudbreak ABCs are potent, long-acting antibacterials designed to target and destroy the bacterial pathogen while engaging and focusing the immune system at the site of infection. Cloudbreak ABCs are conjugates of a novel LPS-targeting peptide and the Fc domain of human IgG1 that offer several potential advantages in the treatment of MDR bacterial infection.

Potential Advantages of Cloudbreak ABCs

  • Direct LPS-targeted killing: Novel TMs tightly bind LPS, permeablize and kill bacteria, including the KAPE pathogens
  • Immunomodulation: EM engagement of the immune system
  • Extended activity at site of action: Long-acting, receptor-mediated transport to lung, limited toxicity
  • Potentiation: Enhances permeability of standard-of-care therapeutics
  • Protection from septic shock: Attenuation of sepsis response through LPS scavenging
1
Direct kill: novel TMs tightly bind LPS and kill bacteria – KAPE spectrum
2
Immunomodulatory: Fc recruits and initiates an innate immune system response
3
Superior PK/ADME: Antibody-like PK, receptor mediated transport to lung, limited kidney exposures
4
Potentiation: Enhances permeability of standard of care therapeutics to provide additional efficacy
5
Protection from septic shock: Attenuation of sepsis response through LPS scavenging

Gram-Negative and MDR Infections

According to data from the CDC and U.S. National Healthcare Safety Network, about 1 in 25 hospitalized patients on any given day in the U.S. has a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and Gram-negative pathogens are responsible for more than 30% of all HAIs. Most of the pneumonia treated in an intensive care unit (ICU) are caused by Gram-negative pathogens.

Infections caused by MDR strains result in significantly higher mortality and hospital lengths of stay compared with those caused by susceptible strains. The cost of treating resistant infections in the U.S. has been estimated to exceed $2 billion annually and is on the rise. The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance determined that by 2050, the number of deaths attributable to resistance would reach 10 million people every year – surpassing cancer to become the lead cause of death worldwide – if the antimicrobial resistance crisis is not resolved.

While antibiotics introduced in the past 15 years have made significant progress in the fight against resistant gram-positive bacteria, such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), a recent CDC report highlighted the urgent need for novel antibiotics effective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), MDR-Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some recently approved or late-stage antibiotics provide adequate coverage of less-resistant strains of CRE and P. aeruginosa, but significant spectrum gaps remain. New resistance mechanisms, such as the emergence of the mcr-1 resistance gene, have rendered even toxic, last-line treatments ineffective.

Immunocompromised patients are at significantly higher risk of developing an MDR Gram-negative infection and have inadequate immune systems to fight these infections. Novel ABCs would provide both direct antibacterial effect and facilitate immune function to leverage as much of the immune system that is present.

Mortality Rate by Pathogen Susceptibility

Markedly higher mortality rates for patients infected with resistant bacteria compared to susceptible strains.

GET IMPORTANT NEWS AND UPDATES BY EMAIL